Images of Today

No Gravatar

Oka’ Yanahli (April, 2012)

             by S.T. Paxton

I recently visited and camped at the Nature Conservancy’s (TNC) Oka’ Yanahli Preserve located south of Connerville, Oklahoma.  The preserve is situated on the west bank of the Blue River.  Oka’ Yanahli (pronounced oh-kuh yuh-naw-lee) means “water flowing” in Chickasaw tongue.  TNC works to preserve the State’s diverse landscape and biodiversity.  Oka’ Yanahli is one of 12 properties stewarded by TNC in Oklahoma.  Properties adjacent to the scenic Blue River are valued for their beauty and Oka’ Yanahli is a real gem.  A unique feature of the site is that the geological contact between the Arbuckle Group of carbonate rocks and the Simpson Group of sandstones and shales cuts diagonally across the property.  Because the Arbuckle and Simpson rocks are fundamentally different in their physical and chemical properties, the rocks display major differences in resistance to erosion.  For this reason, the geomorphic character of the Blue River alluvium changes from north to south along the eastern boundary of the property.

 

Grassy field and tree on the banks of the Blue River near Connerville, Oklahoma.

  

Camping

Early morning view of tents on the TNC preserve.

     

Tents

Early morning view of tents and a pathway leading to the west bank of the Blue River.

  

Grassy field and tree

Grassy field and tree on the banks of the Blue River near Connerville, Oklahoma.

 

View looking upstream from the bank of the Blue River. Difference in relief between the cut bank (on the left) and the edge of the point bar on the right (across the water) is about 4 meters.

 

Cut bank at water's edge

View looking to the south showing cut bank of the Blue River at water’s edge.

   

View upstream from the bank of the Blue River – large, dislodged trees on the right bank are a testimony to the erosive force of the river during high-water events. Note the gully development on the small tributary (lower left of image).

 

Gully

Gully development on the west bank of the Blue River.

 

Boggy Area

Scientists exploring the properties of a boggy area located on the property. The boggy area appears to be coincident with the geological contact between the Arbuckle Group and Simpson Group of rocks.

 

  Chickasaw National Recreation Area, Oklahoma

Water is always a central theme when taking photographs in Chickasaw National Recreation Area.  Water in most of the streams is crystal clear, spring-fed, and teaming with a relatively unique flora and fauna. 

Near Antelope Springs, Chickasaw National Recreation Area, Oklahoma – June 26, 2005 (Color Saturated).

 

 

Near Vendome Well, Chickasaw National Recreation Area, Oklahoma - September 11, 2004 (Color Desaturated).

  

UNDER CONSTRUCTION…

 
Draft – Subject to Revision
______________________________________________________________________
 
Thanks for reading Geology Works Blog…please visit us at Geology Works Home, too!
______________________________________________________________________

 

2 thoughts on “Images of Today

  1. We appreciate Stan coming out and looking at the rock formations on our ranch. We enjoyed finding out how they were formed and how old they might be. Come back any time.
    Enjoyed looking your web site.

    Angie

    • Angie, you and Scott are more than welcome. You certainly have a beautiful location and a geologically interesting landscape. Hope to visit again under “leaf off” conditions! Take care!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *